GROUND LOOPS

Upcoming Releases:

Single: “They Weren’t Made to Last”
Releases: 8/14/20


EP: Ground Loops
Releases: 9/4/20

Label: Rue Defense
Genre: Synth Rock
Influences: Can, Yo la Tengo, Shy Layers, Neu
Location: Ridgewood, NY




They Weren’t Made to Last

(Single-Releases 8/14/20)




Ground Loops (EP)

(EP-Releases 9/4/20)




Press Contact: Graham Bell
253.948.7647
whoisruedefense@gmail.com

Booking Agent: TC Brownell
thomascbrownell@gmail.com


(Photo Credit: Paige Sandilands)


BIO:


The solo project of TC Brownell (Wild Pink, Dead Painters), Ground Loops thrives on minimal arrangements and a knack for letting each sound breathe and grow in its own right. Primarily known as a bassist in his other bands, Brownell began branching out by experimenting with the world of synthesis. “It’s been a whole new world of creativity for me trying to learn to stop playing so much and let the sound design do the heavy lifting,” he noted. Trading loud practice spaces for headphones and a home studio as he adjusted to parenthood over the past year, Brownell learned to be patient with his compositions and to come back later to finish a take. Adding to this, the extended period of quarantine in NYC and around the country shifted the artistic process away from live collaboration toward self-editing and reflection. These themes of rumination on the past and thoughts of losing touch as the years progress show themselves in his lyrics. The debut EP from Ground Loops was recorded at Brownell’s home studio, mixed by Connor Hanwick, and mastered by Carl Saff. Its live component (upon the return of such things) will include Dan Keegan on drums.

CURRENT RELEASE:

THEY WEREN’T MADE TO LAST
The first single from Ground Loops’ debut EP, “They Weren’t Made to Last” focuses on coming to grips with getting older and dealing with the various pitfalls that are inevitably part of the process. Though the message is somewhat melancholic, and sets the stage for similar reveries on childhood and friendship throughout the remaining tracks, a triumphant melody at the end lets in a bit of hope for the future. A straightforward but densely textured undercurrent is punctuated by Brownell’s subdued vocal delivery and bursts of sparkling synthesizer.